Sharia-supporting Linda Sarsour hit with new allegations of charity fraud

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Someone keep Linda Sarsour away from the finances — because she’s found herself in trouble once again.

We reported last month that the Sharia-law supporting “feminist” had raised $112,000 for a Somali Muslim woman named Rahma Warsame, who was allegedly attacked by a white man in a hate crime. She had suffered four missing teeth, according to the fundraiser (but told the police she lost two), a swollen face, busted lips, and a swollen nose as a result of her injuries. She claimed to have been told “you will be shipped back to Africa” while she was being attacked.

Ohio police determined that the attack wasn’t a hate crime, as the Somali woman in question was part of a mob of men and women who attacked 31 year-old Samantha Morales, a woman of Hispanic descent. Morales was attacked after confronting Warsame, who was outside of her apartment complex yelling, and hitting her son with a shoe.

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Morales’ boyfriend is the man alleged to be the “racist,” but as he told the Daily Caller, “I didn’t even have time to talk to any of them because they were over there jumping [Morales] at the time.” Morales was sent to the hospital as a result of her injuries.

If you’re Muslim you can assault someone, get beaten up, then play the victim, and Linda Sarsour will raise hundreds of thousands of dollars for you. Not a bad deal.

That was last month — and this month Sarsour is back in the news again for a separate charity scandal. According to the Daily Wire:

An organization connected to Linda Sarsour pledged to give at least $100,000 to a Jewish cemetery in Colorado back in March. It’s now July and the cemetery still hasn’t received a single penny of it.

According to The Algemeiner:

Sarsour had partnered with Tarek El-Messidi, founder of the Celebrate Mercy nonprofit, to launch a crowdfunding effort aimed at raising money from Muslims to fix vandalized Jewish cemeteries. A total of $162,468 was raised; $50,000 went toward Jewish cemeteries in St. Louis, MO, Chicago, IL and Rochester, NY.

Those three cemeteries received the money from the crowdfunding effort, but somehow the Golden Hill Cemetery in Lakewood, CO has yet to receive any of the remainder of $100,000 or more from the crowdfunding effort that they were promised on March 24.

El-Messidi was given a tour of the cemetery, which was the last time they had been in contact with him.

Neil Price, who has been the chief caretaker of the Golden Hill Cemetery for a year, told Algemeiner that he had left three voicemails for El-Messidi, to no avail. He doesn’t think the cemetery will ever see the money.

“You need budgets and time tables, and none of that is here,” Price said.

A plan to restore the cemetery was already in place, which included “bids on landscaping, a fence and other security” that was premised on receiving the money from Celebrate Mercy.

The Algemeiner report pointed out that in May, Brooklyn Assemblyman Dov Hikind asked in a Facebook post how much of the money Sarsour raised for the Jewish cemeteries actually went to those cemeteries. If Algemeiner’s report is correct, then where did the rest of that $100,000 go?

Given Sarsour’s staunch advocacy for the BDS (boycott, divest, and sanctions against Israel) movement, past statements that “nothing is creepier than Zionism,” as well as her insistence that pro-Israel women should be excluded from the feminist movement because “it just doesn’t make any sense for someone to say, ‘Is there room for people who support the state of Israel and do not criticize it in the movement?’ There can’t be in feminism,” who could’ve possibly seen this one coming?

[Note: This post was written by Matt Palumbo. He is a co-author of the new book A Paradoxical Alliance: Islam and the Left, and can be found on Twitter @MattPalumbo12]

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