Chicago pastor demands parks named for Washington and Jackson be changed because of slavery ties

A pastor from Chicago is now calling on Mayor Rahm Emmanuel to change the names of two parks named after our two most famous founding fathers: George Washington and Thomas Jefferson.

Ever since the rash of Confederate statues being removed and pulled down began, many conservatives expressed concern that such behavior would eventually lead to Jefferson and Washington targeted since they were slave owners, despite the fact it was always their intention for slavery to be eradicated in America.

The Free Beacon is reporting, Bishop James Duke of the Liberation Christian Center said that the city should not honor slave owners in black communities, CBS Chicago reports.

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A statue of Washington stands at the corner of 51st and King Drive, at the northwest entrance to Washington Park. Nearby Jackson Park has no similar statue, but is still named after the seventh president.

“When I see that, I see a person who fought for the liberties, and I see people that fought for the justice and freedom of white America, because at that moment, we were still chattel slavery, and was three-fifths of humans,” Duke said. “Some people out here ask me, say ‘Well, you know, he taught his slaves to read.’ That’s almost sad; the equivalent of someone who kidnaps you, that you gave them something to eat.”

Duke doesn’t think that the parks need to be totally renamed. Rather, he suggested the parks could be changed so that Washington Park memorialized Mayor Harold Washington, while Jackson Park could be named after civil rights leader Rev. Jesse Jackson or singer Michael Jackson.

He insists that he is not trying to erase history, but allowing communities to determine their own heroes and who they choose to memorialize.

So it’s perfectly acceptable for the park to be named for black heroes, but not white ones? How is that not racism?

Both Jefferson and Washington, according to their own personal writings, wanted to see slavery ended, but unfortunately, due to the times, they believed they lacked the support to make it happen and that the colonies, in the fight for freedom, would fracture over the divisive issue.

Perhaps this pastor should learn real history and not the revisionism he’s being spoon fed.

[NOTE: This article was written by Michael Cantrell. Follow him on Twitter @MCantrell0928 and on Facebook]
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