Allen B. West

GOP got the car keys back. Question is, can they drive?

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It was a stunning evening when looked upon in aggregate — Senate, House, and Gubernatorial races — for the GOP. There were races believed to be close that were not — Georgia, Colorado, Kansas, Kentucky, and Arkansas. There were races believed to not be achievable that were — North Carolina. And there was a race not even considered — Virginia. With all that being said, the American people did indeed send a clear message to Washington DC: get back on track.

Now comes the really hard part and that is to present a legislative agenda promoting growth, opportunity, and promise for America in the face of withering fire. This will not be easy for the GOP as the progressive socialist media will be on the attack everyday.

The Democrats will be tougher in the minority even more so than in the majority and from news accounts, don’t expect President Barack Hussein Obama to change — unlike Bill Clinton after his 1994 midterm debacle and subsequent GOP House and Senate majorities. In reading this Politico article it seems evident that the Obama White House will dig their heels in deeper. And there are already rumors about the blame game happening — Senator Harry Reid’s Chief of Staff fingering Obama.

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As reported by Politico, “Voters demanded change from Washington on Tuesday, and Republicans say it’s now up to President Barack Obama to deliver it. But don’t count on that happening. The White House that emerges after the midterm elections won’t look, act or sound drastically different than the one battered for months by Republicans and abandoned by Democrats desperate to hang onto power. The president will seek some common ground with Republicans, but there are limits to how far Obama wants to go — and Senate Democrats will let him go.”

So what were some of the lessons learned from this midterm election?

First I would offer that the era of identity politics may be coming to an end. Out in Colorado, Sen. Mark Udall ran entirely on the “war on women” mantra to the point that the Denver paper referred to him as “Senator Uterus.” It appears the focus on women’s biological parts may matter to a small minority, but is not a singular viable issue at a time when the economy is affecting everyone.

And it is the same with the politics of race — such as we saw with the heinous and despicable flyers invoking images of lynchings and Ferguson, Missouri as a means to intimidate and coerce blacks into voting for Democrats. In an interview with Roland Martin, Michelle Obama encouraged blacks to just get out and vote for Democrats with no regard to the issues — and even advocated for blacks to have some fried chicken after voting — pretty degrading.

And of course it was Louisiana Senator Mary Landrieu who came out and declared that we Southerners have always been racist and sexist — and I thought that Louisiana was a Southern state and she was a woman? No one is talking about the GOP women who won last night — Mia Love, Nikki Haley, Susana Martinez, Joni Ernst, Barbara Comstock, Shelly Moore Capito — oh yeah, they’re just tokens or not real women just cute Taylor Swift-types. Imagine if a GOP retiring senator had said what Iowa Senator Tom Harkin had said — yep, front page news every day and the “war on women” theme would have been ridden into the ground. Such hypocrisy.

Second, it seems the GOP has learned to develop a ground game and be competitive — not there yet, but a true improvement. It will be interesting to get all the exit poll data and final demographic numbers, but the GOP ran some younger and more attractive candidates — not looks — but overall image, who were effective in winning both image and message phases of the campaign. As you gazed across the landscape, you found the old fella being the Democrat.

However, all this aside, the bottom line is to now develop a constitutional conservative legislative agenda that counters the big government Obama agenda. As a matter of fact, that agenda was even successful in very deep blue states such as Illinois, Maryland, and of all places, Massachusetts — go figure.

There has to be a solid phalanx as the GOP goes forward. I would suggest a first time joint House and Senate retreat in order to ensure there is no sunshine between the two legislative bodies, heck, 242+52 almost comes up to the number 300 — hope they have the resolve of Leonidas and the Spartans because they are truly standing in the gap against a determined political opposition.

Lastly, it is imperative that the real endeavor is to educate the electorate and maintain close communications in order to stave off the disinformation that will emanate from the complicit liberal media. That focus has to be on a new era of use in social media and make the American people shareholders. What cannot happen is a violent swing in the opposite direction in 2016. Of course everyone will start talking about the 2016 presidential election probably after the Louisiana runoff early December. This election was not so much about GOP enthusiasm rather than taking the keys to the car away from the Democrats — and they want them back. The only way is to take care of the car and make it run better than it is currently.

Will Obama pivot? Nope, that’s not his nature, and it’s amazing that he’s gone from having supermajorities for the first two years to this in his last two. Yeah, sure, it happens to most presidents — but this was supposed to be such a transformative presidential administration. I guess it wasn’t. As a matter of fact, it is historically not.

Veterans make HORRIBLE discovery outside their business on Pearl Harbor Day

Veterans make HORRIBLE discovery outside their business on Pearl Harbor Day

YIKES: Here's who the betting odds say will be Trump's secretary of state

YIKES: Here's who the betting odds say will be Trump's secretary of state